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Manitoba First Nations Species at Risk Lesson Plans

Secondary, Elementary, Middle

Description

The Kit aims to help teachers engage First Nations students in learning about the role of biodiversity, threats to and loss of species at risk, and the importance of healthy habitats.The Kit also allows students and teachers to explore means for protecting and recovering species at risk and habitat within First Nations territories using tools such as the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and other systems such as First Nations’ own natural laws

 The Teaching Kit is comprised of three components

The Kit also allows students and teachers to
explore means for protecting and recovering
species at risk and habitat within First Nations
territories using tools such as the Species at
Risk Act (SARA) and other systems such as
First Nations’ own natural la

. Introduction to Concepts

. Lesson Plans

. Other Resources (Games and Activities)

General Assessment

What skills does this resource explicitly teach?

The combination of lesson plans helps students develop a number of skills

  • Skills associated with creating effective media (photography, videos, posters)
  • Creative skills - game making, writing and illustrating storybooks, artwork
  • Geography skills - map making
  • Skills associated with scientific method - gathering, recording and analyzing data

Strengths

The strengths teaching kit include the following

  • each of the lesson plans is well articulated -grade levels, estimated time, materials required, learning outcomes, teacher background, and relevant references are included
  • students are active learners - creating games, artwork, photography, videos, education campaigns, field maps
  • the issue (species at risk) is an authentic one and is approached through the study of local examples
  • students may be expected to enjoy the many activities  n the toolkit and emerge well informed on the issue 

Recommendation of how and where to use it

The teaching kit uses basic and extended activities to reach a wide audience (elementary-secondary). It would have particular relevance for those curricular units that deal with habitats, biodiversity, ecosystems, and sustainability of ecosystems.

Relevant Curriculum Units

The following tool will allow you to explore the relevant curriculum matches for this resource. To start, select a province listed below.

  • Step 1Select a province
  • Alberta
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    • Grade 3
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Active citizenship contributes to the vitality of communities that can promote pluralism among diverse people in a democratic society
        • Exploring connections strengthens our understandings of relationships to help us make meaning of the world
    • Grade 9
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      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environment and Outdoor Education: Commitment to Action
    • Grade 11
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      • Biology
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        • Biology 20: Ecosystems and Population Change
    • Grade 12
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 30: Population and Community Dynamics
  • British Columbia
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    • Grade 3
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      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Global Indigenous Peoples: Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
    • Grade 11
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      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environmental Science 11: Human practices affect the sustainability of ecosystems
      • Physical Education & Health
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Physical and Health Education - Outdoor Education: Spending time outdoors allows us to develop an understanding of the natural environment and ourselves
    • Grade 12
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      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environmental Science 12: Living sustainably supports the well-being of self, community, and Earth.
      • Physical Education & Health
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Physical and Health Education - Outdoor Education: Spending time outdoors allows us to develop an understanding of the natural environment and ourselves
  • Manitoba
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    • Grade 4
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      • Aboriginal Languages and Cultures
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Cultural and Linguistic Diversity: Specific Aboriginal Culture
        • Language Competence: Writing, Representing and Producing
      • Science
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        • Habitat and Communities
    • Grade 5
    • Grade 6
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      • Science
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        • Diversity of Living Things
    • Grade 7
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      • Science
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        • Interactions Within Ecosystems
    • Grade 10
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Senior 2 Science: Dynamics of Ecosystems
    • Grade 12
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology: Conservation of Biodiversity
  • New Brunswick
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    • Grade 4
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Habitats
    • Grade 6
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Diversity of Life
    • Grade 10
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Sustainability of Ecosystems
    • Grade 11
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 11: Biodiversity
    • Grade 12
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      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Advanced Environmental Science 120: Earth Systems
        • Introduction to Environmental Science 120: An Overview of Environmental Science
        • Introduction to Environmental Science 120: Sustainable Development
  • Newfoundland & Labrador
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    • Grade 4
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Habitats
    • Grade 6
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Diversity of Life
    • Grade 7
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Interaction of Ecosystems
    • Grade 10
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 1206: Sustainability of Ecosystems
    • Grade 11
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      • Biology
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        • Biology 2201: Interactions among Living Things
        • Biology 2201: Biodiversity
    • Grade 12
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      • Environmental Science
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        • Environmental Science 3205: Introduction to Environmental Science
  • Northwest Territories
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    • Grade 4
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      • Science
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        • Life Systems: Habitats & Communities
    • Grade 6
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Life Systems: Diversity of Living Things
    • Grade 7
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Interactions and Ecosystems
    • Grade 11
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 20: Ecosystems and Population Change
    • Grade 12
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 30: Population and Community Dynamics
  • Nova Scotia
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    • Grade 4
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      • Science
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        • Science 4: Habitats
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    • Grade 7
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 7: Interactions Within Ecosystems
    • Grade 10
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 10: Sustainability of Ecosystems
    • Grade 11
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 11: Biodiversity
  • Nunavut
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    • Grade 4
    • Grade 6
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Life Systems: Diversity of Living Things
    • Grade 11
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 20: Ecosystems and Population Change
    • Grade 12
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biologie 30 :Population and Community Dynamics
  • Ontario
  • Prince Edward Island
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 4
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Habitats
    • Grade 6
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Diversity of Life
    • Grade 7
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Interactions Within Ecosystems
    • Grade 10
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 421A: Sustainability of Ecosystems
        • Science 431A: Life Science, Sustainability of Ecosystems
    • Grade 11
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      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 521A: Biodiversity
    • Grade 12
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Biology
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Biology 621A: Change and Diversity
      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environmental Science 621A: Ecological Principles
        • Environmental Science 621A: Introduction to Environmental Science
  • Quebec
  • Saskatchewan
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    • Grade 4
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Habitats and Communities
    • Grade 6
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      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 6: Life Science: Diversity of Living Things
    • Grade 7
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 7: Life Science: Interactions within Ecosystems
    • Grade 10
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Science 10: Climate and Ecosystem Dynamics
  • Yukon Territory
    • Step 2Select a grade level
    • Grade 3
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Social Studies
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Global Indigenous Peoples: Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
    • Grade 11
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environmental Science 11: Human practices affect the sustainability of ecosystems
      • Physical Education & Health
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Physical and Health Education - Outdoor Education: Spending time outdoors allows us to develop an understanding of the natural environment and ourselves
    • Grade 12
      • Step 3Select a subject
      • Environmental Science
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Environmental Science 12: Living sustainably supports the well-being of self, community, and Earth.
      • Physical Education & Health
        • Step 4Relevant matches
        • Physical and Health Education - Outdoor Education: Spending time outdoors allows us to develop an understanding of the natural environment and ourselves

Themes Addressed

  • Citizenship (1)

    • Ecological Footprint
  • Ecosystems (6)

    • Appreciating the Natural World
    • Biodiversity
    • Endangered Species
    • Habitat Loss
    • Interdependence
    • Wildlife Protection
  • Governance (1)

    • Government Regulations
  • Indigenous Knowledge (1)

    • TEK -- Traditional Ecological Knowledge
  • Land Use & Natural Resources (1)

    • Habitat Restoration

Sustainability Education Principles

Principle Rating Explanation
Consideration of Alternative Perspectives Good

The larger goal of the series of lesson plans is to raise student awareness of the concept of species at risk, to provide examples of at-risk species, to identify the threats to those species, and to explore what actions may be undertaken to meet the challenges presented by species at risk. The assumption is that there is a problem and something should be done.

The opportunity to explore competing perspectives exists in lesson 7 where students represent different organizations in debating whether a particular species should be covered by the Species at Risk Act.

Consideration of Alternative Perspectives:
  • Satisfactory: absence of bias towards any one point of view
  • Good: students consider different points of view regarding issues, problems discussed
  • Very good: based on the consideration of different views, students form opinions and  take an informed position
Multiple Dimensions of Problems & Solutions Good

The students exploration of species at risk is largely approached through the lens of Indigenous Traditional Knowledge (IDK). This is fundamental to the lessons since the intended audience is aboriginal youth. The resource, however, references a number of resources and organizations that may articulate other perspectives and that may be consulted as part of the study 

Multiple Dimensions of Problems & Solutions:

Effectively addresses the environmental, economic and social dimensions of the issue(s) being explored.

  • Satisfactory: resource supports the examination of  these dimensions
  • Good:  resource explicitly examines the interplay of these dimensions
  • Very Good:  a systems-thinking approach is encouraged to examine these three dimensions
Respects Complexity Good

The lesson plans recognize the complex factors that contribute to and result from the problem of species at risk (habitat loss, natural and human obstacles, loss of biodiversity within an ecosystem)) and by so doing suggest something of the possible response.  However, the challenges faced in taking remedial action are not explored. Students are encouraged to take action and to educate others as to the need for action but the difficulties inherent in any larger strategy are not examined.  

Respects Complexity:

The complexity of the problems/issues being discussed is respected.

Acting on Learning Good

Students are required to develop a "Save a Species at Risk" (Lesson 4), campaign to motivate others to protect and recover local species at risk; to monitor a selected habitat; to join a monitoring network; to  create their own "Who's Who video, and to develop and present a management plan to their community.

Acting on Learning:

Learning moves from understanding  issues  to working towards positive change — in personal lifestyle, in school, in the community,  or for the planet

  • Satisfactory: action opportunities are included as extensions 
  • Good: action opportunities are core components of the resource
  • Very Good: action opportunities for students are well supported and intended to result in observable, positive change
Values Education Good

While not directly addressed, the lessons provide opportunities for students to consider the importance they attach to the natural world and their obligations with respect to protecting animals and their habitat.     

Values Education:

Students are explicitly provided with opportunities to identify, clarify and express their own beliefs/values.

Empathy & Respect for Humans Poor/Not considered
Empathy & Respect for Humans: Empathy and respect are fostered for diverse groups of humans (including different genders, ethnic groups, sexual preferences, etc.).
Personal Affinity with Earth Very Good

Many of the lesson plans require that students be in the field observing and recording nature. This includes using digital photography to collect information about habitats (Lesson 1), mapping species at risk (Lesson 5), and collecting information about species over time (Lesson 6)  

Personal Affinity with Earth:

Encourages a personal affinity with -the natural world.  

  • Satisfactory: connection is made to the natural world
  • Good: fosters appreciation/concern for the natural world
  • Very Good: fosters stewardship though practical and respectful experiences out-of-doors 
Locally-Focused Learning Very Good

Lesson plans encourage students to research local examples of species at risk, to invite local resource persons to speak to class, and to undertake action aimed at raising the awareness of the local community with respect to species at risk.  

Locally-Focused Learning:

Includes learning experiences that take advantage of issues/elements within the local community. 

  • Satisfactory: learning is made relevant to the lives of the learners
  • Good: learning is made relevant and has a local focus
  • Very Good: learning is made relevant, local and takes place ‘outside’ , in the community 
Past, Present & Future Poor/Not considered

The study of selected species at risk requires students to investigate the past reasons for the decline in the species, the current status of the species and the future programs and policies that may help preserve the species. 

Past, Present & Future: Promotes an understanding of the past, a sense of the present, and a positive vision for the future.

Pedagogical Approaches

Principle Rating Explanation
Open-Ended Instruction Good

The lesson plans are structured to have students investigate and analyze selected issues and to  arrive at and present their conclusions based on their findings.  Since many of the lesson plans include extensions aimed at secondary grades, the degree of direction and complexity varies depending on the intended audience.

Open-Ended Instruction :

Lessons are structured so that multiple/complex answers are possible; students are not steered toward one 'right' answer.

Integrated Learning Very Good

The resource is both muti-disciplinary and cross-disciplinary. Students are given the opportunity to practice Art ( creation of habitats),  Language Arts ( debating, presenting), Media Studies (analyzing and creating videos), Science (field studies), Social Studies (cultural perspectives), Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge ( presentation by elders, use of native language)

Integrated Learning:

Learning brings together content and skills  from more than one  subject area

  • Satisfactory: content from a number of different  subject areas is readily identifiable
  • Good:  resource is appropriate for use in more than one subject area
  • Very Good:  the lines between subjects are blurred 
Inquiry Learning Good

Many of the lesson plans reflect the principles of discovery learning or learning by doing. Students play games in which they represent  a particular species and discover through experience,  the difficulties of survival.  They create booklets about species at risk, undertake a species at risk campaign, map species at risk and role play representatives of various organization with an interest in the Species at Risk Act.

Inquiry Learning:

Learning is directed by questions, problems, or challenges that students work to address.   

  • Satisfactory: Students are provided with questions/problems to solve and some direction on how to arrive at solutions.
  • Good: students, assisted by the teacher clarify the question(s) to ask and the process to follow to arrive at solutions.  Sometimes referred to as Guided Inquiry
  • Very Good:  students generate the questions and assume much of the responsibility for how to solve them.  . Sometimes referred to as self-directed learning.

 

Differentiated Instruction Very Good

Each of the nine lesson plans is organized around one or more student activities. The result is a variety of activities that reflect a spectrum of student interest and talents. Activities include field studies, art work, media presentations, community education and  research. The many tasks involved in carrying out these activities may be assigned in accordance with particular student learning styles.

Differentiated Instruction:

Activities address a range of student learning styles, abilities and readiness.

  • Satisfactory:  includes a variety of instructional approaches
  • Good: addresses  the needs of visual, auditory &  kinesthetic learners
  • Very Good: also includes strategies for learners with difficulties
Experiential Learning Very Good

The lesson plans represent an effective mixture of authentic learning strategies. Students conduct field studies; participate in a simulation to understand the challenges to species at risk during the migration period; create story books about local plants and animals; organize a species at risk campaign; map areas in the community that provide important habitat for species at risk; and role play individuals attending a Species at Risk Act conference.

Experiential Learning:

Authentic learning experiences are provided

  • Satisfactory: learning takes place through ‘hands-on’ experience or simulation
  • Good: learning involves direct experience in a ‘real world context’
  • Very good: learning involves ‘real world experiences’ taking place’ beyond the school walls.
Cooperative Learning Good

The variety of activities provide numerous opportunities for students to work in groups and share the tasks involved in realizing the goals of the activities. Students cooperate to develop a management plan for local species at risk; create story books; produce a campaign posters; and create their own Who's Who videos. While specific direction is not provided as to to the skills involved, students will have an occasion to develop and practice the associated skills.

Cooperative Learning:

Group and cooperative learning strategies are a priority.

  • Satisfactory:  students work in groups
  • Good: cooperative learning skills are explicitly taught and practiced
  • Very Good: cooperative learning skills are explicitly taught, practiced and assessed
Assessment & Evaluation Satisfactory

Most of the activities contained in the lesson plan result in student generated products- a management plan, a video, artwork, a map, a log book, a role play - each of which provides material for formative or summative evaluation.

Assessment & Evaluation: Tools are provided that help students and teachers to capture formative and summative information about students' learning and performance. These tools may include reflection questions, checklists, rubrics, etc.
Peer Teaching Satisfactory

Students may be expected to learn from one another as a consequence of the many cooperative group activities. Although peer teaching is not a deliberate goal, the student to student interaction in these activities represents a covert if not an overt form of peer teaching.

Peer Teaching:

Provides opportunities for students to actively present their knowledge and skills to peers and/or act as teachers and mentors.

  • Satisfactory: incidental teaching that arises from cooperative learning, presentations, etc.
  • Good or Very Good: an opportunity is intentionally created to empower students to teach other students/community members. The audience is somehow reliant on the students' teaching (students are not simply ‘presenting')
Case Studies Poor/Not considered

Students  examine specific examples of species at risk in order to understand the larger issues involved and the reference section directs student to Internet sites and organizations that provide information on particular species. (Burrowing Owl, Monarch Butterfly, Polar Bear, Woodland Caribou , etc.). Students are also encouraged to focus on their own locale in studying the issue of species at risk. 

Case Studies:

Relevant case studies are included.  Case studies are thorough descriptions of real events from real situations that students use to explore  concepts in an authentic context.

Locus of Control Very Good

Each of the lesson plans is teacher directed but the variety of activities attached to each lesson is such that students have an opportunity to contribute in a way that reflects their particular interests and strengths.

Locus of Control: Meaningful opportunities are provided for students to choose elements of program content, the medium in which they wish to work, and/or to go deeper into a chosen issue.